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Arts & Entertainment

Quick Flick: De-lovely

De-Lovely depicts the life of legendary songsman Cole Porter. Director Irwin Winkler manages to incorporate into the film nearly every significant piece of music that Porter composed.

by 34TH STREET

Back To The Streets

"What's Ramones?" Mike Skinner, the one-man act of The Streets, asks from his cell phone, en route to Utah.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

Don't Pick On Me

Like many Ben Stiller movies, Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story features a great comic premise that never fires on all cylinders.

by JOHN CARROLL

Over The Hump

The Story of the Weeping Camel is a German quasi-documentary filmed in Mongolia's Gobi Desert.

by CARRIE GREENE

Pop Rocks

Former Weezer bassist Matt Sharp told Street last week that he didn't understand distorting guitars these days.

by JOHN CARROLL

This Flight Is Grounded

Steven Spielberg's is on a roll. Wait, scratch that, he was on a roll. In 1998, Spielberg released Saving Private Ryan, and then followed that acclaimed project with A.I., Minority Report, and Catch Me if You Can over the following four years.

by JOHN CARROLL

Walk Away from the Light

Hard-core Christians are going to hate this movie. Then again, the whole point of it is to make fun of them. Saved! has balls.

by ALYSSA LEGLER

A Case of the Mondays

Garfield is a cartoon that many kids watched as a child. Looking back, the cartoon wasn't very funny.

by JOHN CARROLL

The Chronicles of Ridiculous

Vin Diesel has the mental capacity of a Lego Block. That becomes clear as Diesel, once an up-and-coming action hero, reprises one of his most Neanderthal-like roles.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

He's Come Undone

Matt Sharp has been in the music business for over a decade, but with the release of his self-titled solo debut, he finds himself back where he started, when he was Weezer's falsetto-singing bassist. "There were no expectations for that Weezer record," Sharp explains.

by JOHN CARROLL

Double Dog Dare Ya!

Love Me If You Dare is not your average movie about childhood sweethearts. Julien and Sophie have been madly in love since grade school.

by MARKIAN DOBCZANSKY

Back to Wizard World

The Potterphobic won't go to see the film. The Potterphilic will be compelled by overwhelming hype. On the sidelines, probably dragged by their Potterphilic friends, will be those who balk at the idea of seeing the movie before reading the books. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban will not disappoint the two latter groups.

by GERARD LEONE

To Heaven Through Hell

"Heavy punk rock is the best way to describe it," explains Ben Perri, lead singer of From Autumn to Ashes.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

Keeping it Simple?

Once a near-popstar, jaded by his brush with "careerist music," Simple Kid is now a one-man act who writes and composes.

by ANNE HENOCHOWICZ

What a Disaster

MoveOn.org, a democratic, internet-based advocacy group, billed The Day After Tomorrow as "The Movie the White House Doesn't Want You To See." For once, the White House demonstrates some good taste.

by JOHN CARROLL

It's No Hogwarts

Comic books carry a bad stigma. The common man regards them as cheap, childish rags that should be abandoned as one enters the adult world.

by JOHN CARROLL

Clearly Canadian

She's the same old Alanis. She's been a victim. She's been a bitch. She's gotten better. If there is a reason for So-Called Chaos, it's pain.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

A Classic Classic

Already, Troy is the best film of the summer. The hyped movie fails to disappoint and is reminiscent of Gladiator. While those who know Homer's story of Greece's siege of Troy will find no surprises in this movie, they will certainly be delighted by it.

by ABUBAKARI ZUBERI

Black and Vice

If a film could ever ooze indie cred, it would probably be Jim Jarmusch's Coffee and Cigarettes. The film, comprised of a series of vignettes, was shot over the past two decades, and at times plays like a short story collection on film.

by JOHN CARROLL

Green with Envy

The original Shrek lost a lot over repeat viewings. People frequently quoting the parfait line didn't help, either.

by JOHN CARROLL

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