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Arts & Entertainment

Benicio del Toro is Hot

They say that at the moment a person dies, they lose exactly 21 grams. On a death bed questioning this very phenomenon, begins 21 Grams, the new film by Amores Perros writer Guillermo Arriaga and director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu. Originally written in Spanish, but adapted for more exposure and notable English-speaking cast, the film shows the intense few months before and after a deathly accident forces three lives from very different backgrounds to intersect.

by EUGENIA SALVO

Where Are They Now?

Caroline in the City (1995-1999) ? Caroline Duffy married Del and then tragically lost a limb in a freakish accident involving ink and a spatula. ? Richard Karinsky finally realized he was gay and broke the Duffster's heart for good. ? Del Cassidy was the first to create a "You lost a limb and I no longer love you" greeting card. My So-Called Life (1994-1995) ? Angela Chase finally got a clue. ? Jordan Catalano cut his hair and stopped being hot.

by YONA SILVERMAN

War in the Ambulance

For many fans, disillusion ensues when their favorite band makes the dreaded jump from an indie to a major record label.

by ZACH SMITH

Quick Flicks

The Missing 2 of 5 stars Directed by: Ron Howard Starring: Tommy Lee Jones, Cate Blanchett Rated: R Breaking away from his built-for-an-Oscar work on A Beautiful Mind, Ron Howard presents a less commercial, less inspired offering in The Missing. Set in rural New Mexico in the late 19th century, the tedious and thin plot finds Maggie (Cate Blanchett) accepting the help of her estranged father (Tommy Lee Jones) in a heroic hunt for her teenage daughter Lily.

by 34TH STREET

Nathaniel Kahn interview

Earlier this week, Nathaniel Kahn sat down with Street to discuss his new movie, My Architect. My Architect is an emotional and intelligent film dealing with Nathaniel Kahn's loss of his father, famed architect Louis Kahn, a Penn graduate and professor.

by 34TH STREET

I Want My MTV

If MTV's 30 second video clips of Beyonce and Britney don't do it for you anymore, the Directors Label is here to help.

by JOHN CARROLL

Girls On Film

No Greatest Hits DVD would be complete without topless female mud-wrestling -- at least that's how English synth-junkies Duran Duran see it. This collection compiles nearly two decades worth of glitz, from 1981's self-titled debut to 1997's Medazzaland. The glam band's biggest success laid in constant MTV rotation, and these music videos emphasize their expert exploitation of the medium. 1980s music specialized in cheesy special effects, synths, heavy beats and weird hair.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

After the Gold Rush

Angie Aparo's got a beef with the record industry. The singer/songwriter -- known for hits "Spaceship" and "Hush" off 2000's The American -- is currently between labels and has been unable to garner radio play.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

Reviews

In Tupac: Resurrection, the story of late hip-hop artist Tupac Shakur is told viscerally through the use of his own words.

by 34TH STREET

Cash Money

Faced with slumping sales, the record industry has tried new methods -- like including a bonus CD or DVD with albums -- to provide consumers with incentives to buy rather than download.

by CLAYTON NEUMAN

Blink and You'll Miss It

Punk rock is quite an amusing genre, especially because of its fans. They'll support their groups whether the crowds have five people or 100, but once you start inching towards 200, well, you're a sell out. Blink-182 is one of many punk bands who slaved away at making mediocre punk rock before hitting it big with a poppier album.

by JOHN CARROLL

She Was the Slutty One

We all know her best as troubled youth Jen on Dawson's Creek, and fondly remember her for films such as Dick, Halloween H20, But I'm a Cheerleader and, of course, Lassie. Now Michelle Williams is taking her career to the next level, as she boldly abandons Hollywood (goodbye Lassie) and makes her mark on the independent film industry.

by MAGGIE HENNEFIELD

Money Can't Buy Me Love

Whether or not downloading music is illegal no longer matters to the record industry and artists. The new question is how to capitalize off of new technology in order to stop plummeting profits.

by ZACH SMITH

Santa's Got a Brand New Bag

With the holiday season approaching, filmmakers are full of warm fuzzies in the hopes of touching a few wallets with that holiday spirit.

by EUGENIA SALVO

Just preachy

Lauryn Hill, Pras and Wyclef Jean have walked very different paths since The Fugees broke up. Hill was a hit with both critics and fans with her debut album, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill. Her follow-up, an MTV Unplugged album released four years later, was met with much head scratching.

by JOHN CARROLL

Green thumbs

British Sea Power's Yan is so cool that he doesn't need another name. When not talking to Street on the phone in a sometimes indecipherable accent, Yan scours the forests for trees and shrubbery to adorn BSP's live act.

by JOHN CARROLL

Jesus died for somebody's sins

The Matrix was a good movie. Perhaps a great movie to some, but commonly accepted as at least a good movie by most.

by YONA SILVERMAN

Adams' song

Prepare to dance in your undies again -- the Madonna of alt-country is back and louder than ever. With his first official follow-up to the critically acclaimed Gold, Ryan Adams has managed to successfully re-invent himself.

by EUGENIA SALVO

Quick Flicks

Love Actually Directed by: Richard Curtis Starring: Hugh Grant, Colin Firth, Keira Knightley, Emma Thompson Rated: R 3 out of 5 stars Love Actually not only has eight times the characters of a typical love story, but eight times the Christmas spirit!

by 34TH STREET

You've come a long way, baby

The Bridge: Cinema de Lux opened its doors on Nov. 8, 2002, and after a year of operation, the theater has come a long way from the chaos that surrounded its opening weekend.

by JOHN CARROLL

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