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Arts & Entertainment

Seth Cohen's ipod, you've done it again

When a show loses its edge, there's no reason for its soundtrack to suffer as well. By consistently bringing relatively unknown yet talented artists into the spotlight, "The O.C." enriches the musical horizons of many a viewer.

by NDREW LEE

Guilty Pleasure

Andrew Thompson and his genius found me when I least expected it, and I'm not surprised. It was serendipity, or karma, or something Eastern or something.

by 34TH STREET

HOLY CRAP, HARRY POTTER 4!!!!!

It is very difficult to cram 734 pages into a film, even one which is two-and-a-half hours long. However, this is what director Mike Newell (Mona Lisa Smile) has successfully accomplished with the fourth installment of the Harry Potter series, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. While fanatic fans of the book will be able to pick out what is missing (no house elves), Newell does an excellent job of cutting out the sub-plots to create a clear, concise storyline that follows the main plot of the book. Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe) is a young wizard who is back for his fourth year at Hogwart's School of Wizardry and Witchcraft, where the historic Tri-Wizard Tournament is going to be taking place.

by COREY HULSE

A Composer Comes of Age

I almost feel as if I'm channeling music when I improvise," says jazz saxophonist Ron Kerber. Performing at Chris's Jazz Cafe in Philadelphia on a warm November night, his eyes are shut, and at the climactic moments his countenance becomes mangled.

by JON LEVIN

Lost in space, in a good way

Zathura, which promotes itself as "a new adventure from the world of Jumanji," involves a pair of siblings left alone at home who find and play a forgotten board game which gives them a lot more than they bargained for.

by TIM WILKINS

Pride (in the name of beating a dead horse)

Pride & Prejudice features some fine performances, lovely scenery and costumes and a serviceable script, but ultimately begs the question: why make another version of this beloved Jane Austen novel, especially after the wonderful 1995 BBC production starring Colin Firth? Well, one answer is that Keira Knightley, playing Miss Elizabeth Bennet, looks ravishing in period dress.

by JESS PURCELL

Clop clop bang bang - like an amish drive-by

Street Film recently spoke with Robert Downey Jr. and Val Kilmer, stars of the upcoming comedy-thriller Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, about drugs, gay detectives, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Street Film: Robert, do you ever feel as though you've been pigeonholed by American critics and robbed of the recognition you deserve because of your highly publicized struggle with drug addiction? Robert Downey Jr.: I was robbed-- Val Kilmer: I'll answer that on behalf of Robert.

by COREY HULSE

Black and Blues

On their way to the bathroom on a flight to Seattle, the Black Keys spotted the lead singer from Train in first class.

by ALEX JACOBS

Half dollar, whole story

Rapper Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson, who has had success with his albums Get Rich or Die Tryin' and The Massacre, recently talked with Street about prosthetics, Shakespeare and his upcoming autobiographical film. Street Film: Was it a big transition going from making music videos to making movies? 50 Cent: Absolutely.

by JONATHAN LEHR

Finally, some good news out of iraq

"Welcome to the suck" is the motto, repeatedly delivered by sniper Troy (Peter Sarsgaard), that summarizes the experience of the Marines in the first Gulf War, at least as far as Jarhead portrays the experience.

by ADAM KATZ

The Super Furries Move on

We killed them. We cut them up, and we had one last show where we had little children dressed up as yetis.

by JIM NEWELL

Television killed the indie-radio stars

While their shows have always been received favorably by fans, Wilco has not built its reputation as a live band.

by ALEX JACOBS

Paradise is not lost

Director Hany Abu-Assad has created a masterpiece in Paradise Now, the story of Said (Kais Nashef) and Khaled (Ali Suliman), two Palestinian friends preparing for a suicide bombing in Tel-Aviv.

by YINKA NEIL

My kippah's cooler than yours

You may not know it, but you and the Hasids have a lot in common. At least that's part of the message of Israeli director Giddi Dar's latest film, Ushpizin. The film tells the story of Moshe Bellanga (played by Shuli Rand), an Israeli who has recently adopted the lifestyle of a sect of Hasidic Jews known as Breslevers. As the Jewish harvest festival of Sukkot approaches, Moshe and his wife Malli are penniless and unable to prepare for the seven-day holiday.

by RUBEN BROSBE

Tangled up in Jew David Berman turns focus inward

Four years after Bright Flight, David Berman returns to his post as the poet laureate of indie rock.

by NDREW LEE

Hanson: The 'Street' Interview

Street Music: How is your latest album Underneath different from you older stuff? What were you trying to achieve? Isaac Hanson: I would say Underneath is probably the most mellow record we've done over the years.

by JON LEVIN

This movie...how do you say...ah, yes...blows

Despite a dramatic opening, golden Z's and a suspenseful score, The Legend of Zorro never reaches an ultimate climax.

by CHELSEA ALBRIGHT

This is not a superhero Movie

The focus of Shopgirl is Mirabelle Buttersfield (Claire Danes), a quiet, insecure glove saleswoman at Saks, an ingenue from Vermont living alone in her L.A.

by JON PASSARO

Holy crap -- Uma Thurman is on j-date?!?

In Prime, Meryl Streep portrays the Jewish Mother rather convincingly as Lisa Metzger, a therapist who discovers her patient (Uma Thurman), who's 37, divorced and definitely not Jewish, is dating her 23-year-old son (Bryan Greenberg). Sure, she'd rather her son be a CPA or a lawyer than follow his true calling as an artist and worries about the religion of her future grandchildren over a pastrami on rye, but Streep refrains from beating the stereotype to death.

by SARA LEVINE

The Future of 'Star Wars'

They are the words that aspiring Jedi Masters and Sith Lords have dreaded for years: "This is it. We've done Episode I through Episode VI and there won't be anymore films at all.

by JEFF LEVIN

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