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Arts & Entertainment

Stay Classy, Comedy

With the release of Will Ferrell's new comedy, Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy, this summer is officially a good one for comedy.

by JOHN CARROLL

Eye See You

Facing Windows portrays the life of Giovanna (Giovanna Mezzogiorno), a 29 year old Italian woman dissatisfied with her job, frustrated by her marriage, and generally overwhelmed by life.

by HANNAH AUGUST

A Knightley Knight's Tale

King Arthur was a success even before it came out, at least for guys who like guy movies. It's got everything that a great action saga needs: fierce battle sequences, a hot chick and a passable plot.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

Lions and Tigers and Bears

Remember way back in the day when you watched movies all about animals running around, getting into trouble and having all sorts of adventures?

by CHRIS BELLIS

Climbing Up The Walls

The original Spider-man was a good film -- in fact, it probably was the best movie to come out of the recent comic book craze in the film industry.

by JOHN CARROLL

The Rising

There is one piece of advice that Dave Bielanko -- lead singer of Marah -- has for people who bash his band: "Whatever you wanna do is good with us.

by EUGENIA SALVO

Freedom Fighter

The four-star grade is pretty random. As a film, Fahrenheit 9/11 has its flaws, but as a 2004 event, it's more important than any other movie released in 2004.

by JOHN CARROLL

Quick Flick: De-lovely

De-Lovely depicts the life of legendary songsman Cole Porter. Director Irwin Winkler manages to incorporate into the film nearly every significant piece of music that Porter composed.

by 34TH STREET

Back To The Streets

"What's Ramones?" Mike Skinner, the one-man act of The Streets, asks from his cell phone, en route to Utah.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

Don't Pick On Me

Like many Ben Stiller movies, Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story features a great comic premise that never fires on all cylinders.

by JOHN CARROLL

Over The Hump

The Story of the Weeping Camel is a German quasi-documentary filmed in Mongolia's Gobi Desert.

by CARRIE GREENE

Pop Rocks

Former Weezer bassist Matt Sharp told Street last week that he didn't understand distorting guitars these days.

by JOHN CARROLL

This Flight Is Grounded

Steven Spielberg's is on a roll. Wait, scratch that, he was on a roll. In 1998, Spielberg released Saving Private Ryan, and then followed that acclaimed project with A.I., Minority Report, and Catch Me if You Can over the following four years.

by JOHN CARROLL

Walk Away from the Light

Hard-core Christians are going to hate this movie. Then again, the whole point of it is to make fun of them. Saved! has balls.

by ALYSSA LEGLER

A Case of the Mondays

Garfield is a cartoon that many kids watched as a child. Looking back, the cartoon wasn't very funny.

by JOHN CARROLL

The Chronicles of Ridiculous

Vin Diesel has the mental capacity of a Lego Block. That becomes clear as Diesel, once an up-and-coming action hero, reprises one of his most Neanderthal-like roles.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

He's Come Undone

Matt Sharp has been in the music business for over a decade, but with the release of his self-titled solo debut, he finds himself back where he started, when he was Weezer's falsetto-singing bassist. "There were no expectations for that Weezer record," Sharp explains.

by JOHN CARROLL

Double Dog Dare Ya!

Love Me If You Dare is not your average movie about childhood sweethearts. Julien and Sophie have been madly in love since grade school.

by MARKIAN DOBCZANSKY

Back to Wizard World

The Potterphobic won't go to see the film. The Potterphilic will be compelled by overwhelming hype. On the sidelines, probably dragged by their Potterphilic friends, will be those who balk at the idea of seeing the movie before reading the books. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban will not disappoint the two latter groups.

by GERARD LEONE

To Heaven Through Hell

"Heavy punk rock is the best way to describe it," explains Ben Perri, lead singer of From Autumn to Ashes.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

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