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Film & TV

Something old, 'something new'

In Something New, first-time director Sanaa Hamri makes an admirable effort to increase discourse on the perpetually controversial topic of race.

by GREG MORAN

That Guy

This week's "That Guy" is none other than Michael C. Maronna. Michael C. who, you ask? You may not know his name but you'll never forget his pale skin, gangly figure, fiery mane or his cracking pubescent voice as narrator of the bizarre storylines of Nickelodeon's cult favorite, The Adventures of Pete and Pete. Since Pete and Pete's cancellation in 1996, Michael has been on the Hollywood backburner, getting suspended from high school for setting guitars on fire, studying film and re-emerging onto the Hollywood scene. In 2002, Maronna made his first appearance on the big screen since his 1990 debut in Home Alone as Jeff, one of Kevin's (Macaulay Culkin) older siblings.

by JULIA LUDWIG

Dept. of interracial relations

Kriss Turner's breakthrough screenplay Something New proves to be a breath of fresh air in multiple ways.

by GREG MORAN

Not old

Some higher power decided to inflict the human race with the ineffable and inextinguishable desire for sex.

by ZEV ROSEN

Big Momma's In Da House

Director John Whitesell literalizes tropes of gender and racial identity confusion in his Big Momma's House 2, which meditates upon the nuanced difficulties of existing in society as an obese African-American woman, while in reality being a skinny black man.

by MAGGIE HENNEFELD

Pootie tang and pokemon

Street: Could you tell us a little about how the Video Library started? Attiba Royster: I'm not sure exactly -- I only started this job about four years ago -- the store has been around before me.

by JANICE HAHN

Comfort for the cold

The long stretch between winter and spring breaks is arguably the worst time of the year. The holidays are over, it's cold and dreary and few people around here brave the outdoors without a Burberry scarf and pants tucked into their Ugg boots.

by 34TH STREET

Many Seamen

In Annapolis, James Franco plays Jake Huard, a shipyard worker who joins the U.S. Naval Academy.

by EMILY LASKY

Nanny diaries

Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead, Mary Poppins and Mrs. Doubtfire are just a few of the "nanny" movies that have thrilled us, made us laugh and made us cry.

by STEPHEN MORSE

Light up a 'Match Point'

Woody Allen's new film, Match Point, is a departure from his recent string of less-than-stellar comedies.

by DUSTIN ROSEN

Scary new world

The scenery in The New World is very pretty. The trees are pretty, the water is pretty, the sun is pretty.

by EMILY LASKY

That guy

David Koechner is one of those actors who is perfectly content playing "policeman number two." Though he's not usually on the screen for more than a couple of minutes, he manages to garner up a small, but well-deserved laugh.

by 34TH STREET

Scarlett fever

Match Point was a departure from The Island -- I thought you were going to go action on us.

by DUSTIN ROSEN

By your powers combined, I am Captain Communism!

Salt of the Earth has the distinction of being the only film blacklisted by the United States government.

by COMRADE COREY

Better red than dead

A bold cinematic statement of rebellion, Warren Beatty's 1981 Hollywood masterpiece Reds challenges mainstream political thought on every level.

by COMRADE JEFF

Ruthless Dictator Turned Director

The People's Republic of Street Film recently sat down for a conference call with the man, the myth and the legend, Fidel Castro, to talk about werewolves, dominos and his upcoming musical production Springtime for Castro. The following interview was edited for maximum happiness, equality and pro-state sentiment. People's Republic of Street Film: Fidel, comrade, bubelah, what can we look forward to from the state-run media in the upcoming holiday season? Cuban President Fidel Castro: Well, comrade, I have some exciting new projects coming up from the Ministry of Propaganda.

by COMRADE COREY

Criminal injustice

Documentarian Jessica Sanders' film After Innocence follows the lives of nine wrongfully convicted prisoners who, after years of false imprisonment, are released with the help of newly introduced DNA evidence.

by JON GUTMAN

Justice, 50 years later

In August 1955, a 14-year-old African American named Emmett Louis Till left Chicago to visit relatives in Money, Mississippi; during his stay he was killed for whistling at a white woman and became a catalyst for the American Civil Rights Movement.

by YINKA NEIL

George clooney never saw an egg mcmuffin he didn't like

Good Night, and Good Luck director George Clooney produces and stars in the hot new political thriller Syriana, about the ins and outs of the global oil business.

by JEFF LEVIN

Go for the gold

Transamerica: Felicity Huffman plays a transsexual who discovers she has a son from when she was still a man.

by AMY STAROSA

PennConnects

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