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Film & TV

Inspirational Carjacking

Crash is a film that looks at the separate lives of a seemingly unrelated group of multi-ethnic people living in LA.

by STEPHEN MORSE

Gripping, no?

T he Interpreter, a well acted and politically relevant film, begins as U.N. interpreter Silvia Broome (Nicole Kidman) overhears a plot to assassinate Edmund Zuwanie, the president of the fictitious and war-torn African country Matobo.

by JESS PURCELL

A lot like shit

You've got to try pretty hard to make a movie with a plot line as pathetic as A Lot Like Love's.

by STEPHEN R. MORSE

Philadelphia Film Festival: Week 2

The 2005 Philadelphia Film Festival will continue through April 20th and this marks Street's second week of extensive coverage.

by 34TH STREET

Van wilder gets scary-like

On the evening of November 14, 1974, in the small town of Amityville in Long Island, Ronald "Ronny" Defeo murdered his parents and four siblings with a shotgun.

by JIM NEWELL

Philadelphia Film Festival

From April 7-20, movie theaters across the city will participate in the Philadelphia Film Festival. Visit the festival's website (www.phillyfests.com) for more information on the movies and their screenings.

by 34TH STREET

I loved you in 'Dazed and Confused'

"Meat out there on the table, that's gonna be my breakfast, lunch and dinner," actor Matthew McConaughey jokes as he steps out of his trailer.

by JANICE HAHN

Red Sox, Sex and Breathing

Fever Pitch is, essentially, identical to every other effervescent Drew Barrymore comedy released in the past five years.

by MICHELLE DUBERT

Where's your pound now?

Millions is one of those rare films with witty dialogue that appeals to viewers of all ages.

by STEPHEN R. MORSE

Ending on a happy note

Danny Boyle directed Trainspotting, your favorite movie about heroin, and shortly thereafter you became a junkie.

by STEPHEN R. MORSE

A Total Bummer

In My Country does not take place in South Africa during the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of 1996, in which the many victims of the brutal apartheid regime confronted their torturers.

by JEFF LEVIN

Holy Pancakes, Batman

Aliens of the Deep would've been better in 3-D. The IMAX film follows producer/director James Cameron as he befriends a team of marine biologists as well as NASA scientists and travels to tectonic fault lines at the bottom of the ocean.

by ROB COHEN

We got a case of the Mondays

Street is all about helping out the local movie house peddling cheap liquor on a Monday night.

by BEN CRAIR

Don't Punk Me, Ass

When will Ashton Kutcher learn his lesson? Certain people are off limits. He can't go around "punking" everyone, especially Bernie Mac. In Kevin Rodney Sullivan's Guess Who, Kutcher plays Simon Green, a successful young stockbroker who is engaged to Theresa Jones (Zoe Saldana). When Theresa's parents renew their wedding vows on their 25th anniversary, Theresa takes it as an opportunity to introduce her parents to her white fiance.

by ADAM KATZ

Silverstone rises from the dead

From the producers of Barbershop and Bringing Down the House, Beauty Shop transports the ethos of the "ghetto" Barbershop to a women's salon.

by STEPHEN R. MORSE

Review: The Pacifier

A Navy Seal turns in his helicopters and semi-automatics to navigate the perils of suburbia: diapers, diapers, diapers (let's just say excrement-related humor abounds) and darned kids who simply refuse to wear their tracking devices.

by 34TH STREET

Disney Disses Harvard

"From small town Mathlete to big time Athlete," says the movie poster. Sounds promising, eh? Ice Princess is only watchable if you bring a punching bag for irritating Joan Cusack moments.

by PERRIN BAILEY

Don't Go to Bars

It's 10 p.m. on St. Patrick's Day, and you still have no plans. Your "friends" all went downtown to bars, but you can't go because your fake was confiscated at a party a couple weeks ago, and you weren't willing to pay the bouncer $50 to get it back.

by 34TH STREET

I just want to thank my girlfriend...

It's about midnight, and I'm greeted with the abrasive jarring sound of a moving cart rolling over brick in the lobby of Sansom West.

by MAWUSE ZIEGBE

Rory has muscular dystrophy

It's easy to expect inspiration with Rory O'Shea Was Here. The film tells of Rory O 'Shea (James McAvoy), a rebellious teen with muscular dystrophy, and his friendship with Michael Connelly (Steven Robertson), a shy boy whose cerebral palsy gives him difficulty speaking.

by JENNIFER ZUCKERMAN

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