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Music

Where Are My Chucks?

Highly anticipated doesn't even begin to describe sentiment towards The Strokes' new album, Room On Fire. This being only their second effort, the hype that surrounds these five New Yorkers has been working harder than a crackhead on speed.

by EUGENIA SALVO

Caught red-handed

Gray Davis, Recalled Governor of California -- The public relations nightmare that came about after the RIAA sued a twelve-year-old girl forced the Industry to refine their suing strategy.

by 34TH STREET

10 shit stirring album covers

W.A.S.P: ANIMAL (FUCK LIKE A BEAST) EP Meaning lies somewhere in this cover, I just need some time and a few analytical essays to unlock the secret.

by 34TH STREET

The Way They Move

Dave Navarro once said that going solo is the kiss of death. Then he went solo. Now he's playing guitar for Christina Aguilera at the MTV Video Music Awards.

by ALEX KOPPELMAN

Immaculate Erection

Dan Larkin knows Liam & Me are going to make it. "We all are," he says over the phone from Gainesville, Fla.

by SAMMY MACK

Mopping Up

Aaron Lewis may be a moping and MTV-friendly Fred Durst suck-up, but his band isn't half bad live. On Saturday, Staind and Sevendust kicked off the first day of their tour with a sonic flurry of rock proportions. As Sevendust's Thundercats-esque red and black flag descended, testosterone coursed madly through the audience's veins.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

They won't choke you

James Reimer does not exactly stick out like a sore thumb alongside his 23 other band mates in The Polyphonic Spree.

by ZACH SMITH

Quick Spins: The good, the bad, and the ugly

The guitars disappeared, but the clouds of depression hanging over A Perfect Circle's music have not.

by 34TH STREET

Digital Video Diary

Regular Guys is an intelligent, interesting and entertaining German film. Although intensely boring, it's a fantastic movie if you watch it in well spread-out 15 minute chunks.

by 34TH STREET

Addicted to Sobriety

Off the crystal meth and back in the studio, Rufus Wainwright puts forth his most sober and self-reflective album to date.

by SAMMY MACK

Death Cock speaks

With the release of You Forgot It In People, Broken Social Scene was catapulted from an unknown Canadian band to one of the most talked about groups in indie rock.

by JOHN CARROLL

Party Animal

I'm not a metalhead, and as I pushed my way through the bearded and pierced attendees of last Thursday's Andrew W.K.

by JOHN CARROLL

Country Grammar

Remember that song "Ugly" that had you "throwin' 'bows" at the party and wishing you were from Hicktown, Georgia?

by MAWUSE ZIEGBE

Bump and Grind

Nicholas Payton gets more ass than Wilt Chamberlain -- on one of his better days. And it's not as though this classically trained trumpet player is keeping it a secret.

by WILLIAM BECKERMAN

Mortal Sinners

Ah, the memories... I remember my first step into punk when I heard MXPX covering "Summer of '69." I thought it was the greatest thing since sliced bread. Since then, I have ditched Christian pop-punk, and so has MXPX on their new LP, Before Everything and After. That may not be a good thing in their case.

by MITCH MANGER

Freeeeedom!

You could make a drinking game out of all the different Scottish inventions. Golf. Adhesive postage stamps.

by TAMMY FERTIG

Dressy For Successy

Attention, indie head-bobbers! Dressy Bessy's self-titled album, their third release, is one of the catchiest albums of the year.

by JOHN CARROLL

Fall Music Preview

Dave Matthews, Some Devil, September 23 (RCA) Choosing to leave the band out of his name and album, Dave Matthews embarks on the tricky path of creating a solo album.

by ZACH SMITH

C'mon, feel the angst

For the music snob, the first concert occupies a sacred space. Whether awful or amazing, we remember that first show, be it grooving to New Kids on the Block or sitting with your parents, suffering through a James Taylor set.

by ROSS CLARK

Dismemberment disbanded

Every advertisement was billing it as the Dismemberment Plan's last show ever but when lead singer Travis Morrison walked on stage after Engine Down's serviceable opening set, he set the record straight on the "big fat lie." Turns out that the Plan had one more show, in their hometown of Washington, D.C.

by JOHN CARROLL

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