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Music

Unbreakable

Throughout hip hop's three decade plus history, no true superstar has emerged from Philly. Emcee after Philly emcee has seen fleeting success, but problems (usually legal) stopped any true movement from occurring (see Beanie Sigel's State Property camp). So, the answer might have to come in the form of a producer.

by ,

Reviews

Redman Red Gone Wild Redman aka Reggie Noble is a self- acknowledged jokester, who wittily balances ridiculous weed-aggrandizing verse with hilarious social commentary.

by RAFAEL GARCIA

Lil' Flip

Houston was a necessary step in the evolution of the southern hip hop aesthetic. It allowed the mainstream to digest the truly southern sound - previously only found on "BET Uncut" - rather than the sleeker major label-driven version with little compromise.

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YouTube clip of the week

When asked to write about an up-and-coming or a classic jazz performance for this week's column I attempted to find something niche, but when it comes to jazz on YouTube, nothing beats the 1959 CBS performance by the Miles Davis Quintet of "So What." So what?

by ALEX ULLMAN

Neil Young

Neil Young follows up last year's release of Live at the Fillmore East with Live at Massey Hall 1971, and the two records could not be any less alike.

by ADAM DRICI

Klaxons

Myths of the Near Future is Klaxons' American debut album, lauded as the defining act of the New Rave movement - a term the band describes as "an in-joke that caught on." Hailing from London, where they have a large underground following, the Klaxons' debut starts off slow with the mild "Two Receivers" before picking up speed that doesn't relinquish for the remainder of the album. The band likes to characterize their music as "psychedelic/progressive/pop," with long keyboard solos and subtle use of vocal harmony, which sounds surprisingly versatile.

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Modest Mouse

Three years after their last studio release, We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank continues Modest Mouse's musical odyssey from where it left off.

by RUBEN BROSBE

Crime Mob

Crunk ain't dead. At least that's what Atlanta's Crime Mob would have you believe on their latest record, Hated on Mostly.

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!!!

!!! (pronounced "chk-chk-chk") hits its three-year release schedule like clockwork with its third dance-punk album Myth Takes.

by RAFAEL GARCIA

Macy Gray

Perhaps trying too hard to "Finally [Make You] Happy," Macy Gray's most recent album, Big, moves away from Gray's identifiably scratchy brand of R&B/soul towards a more sell-out sound of popular funk.

by KERRY GOLDS

Stevie nicks

Before Britney shaved her head and Madonna abused wigs, there was Stevie Nicks and her static sorceress hairstyles.

by ALEX KWAN

Panda bear

Animal Collective band member Noah Lennox's (aka Panda Bear) cheery third solo album, Person Pitch, is a far cry from his previous album, Young Prayer.

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Rock Academy

A raucous sound will fill the air at the corner of 22nd and Chestnut St. tonight as scores of people line up to see Tokyo Police Club open a sold out show for the Cold War Kids.

by ALEX KWAN

YouTube Clip of the week

Any conversation about the changing nature of music in the face of Myspace, YouTube et al.

by RUBEN BROSBE

Jonny Lives!

Jonny Lives! sounds so much like Weezer, a friend passing by who heard this record playing stopped and asked where this new Weezer single could be found.

by RAFAEL GARCIA

Youtube Clip of the week

Yoshimi and crew throw away the childish eager-to-please vibe of lead single "UMA," from their latest album, Taiga, with this track, the second single off the album.

by LEO C. REILLY

Short Music Reviews

rich boy Rich Boy On his new album, Maurice Richards (under the moniker Rich Boy) attempts to establish his hometown of Mobile, Alabama as the new epicenter of Southern Rap hotness.

by 34TH STREET

Podcasts killed the radio star

In the beginning there was Napster. And it was good. But one day the Recording Industry Association of America decided it didn't really appreciate people getting their product for, you know, free.

by RUBEN BROSBE

broken vista social subscene

In Apostle Of Hustle, Broken Social Scene's lead guitarist, Andrew Whiteman, has finally found the perfect outlet to sport his breathy vocals.

by ALEX KWAN

Classic case

Somewhere between dark and optimistic, Classic Case's latest album Losing at Life is a moody experiment, exploring the gray area between hard rock/grunge and alternative.

by TUSHAR VASHISHT

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