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Music

Cut it up you Jive Turkeys

For TV on the Radio, video did not kill the radio star. Somehow they managed to fuse the two together.

by KALI BACKER

Harmonies and Twin Peaks

Let's say you happened to have five guys that look like they belong in different bands. Hand them some instruments, let them roam free with their ideas and allow for some serious harmonizing.

by EUGENIA SALVO

Editor's Picks

Kali Backer Pavement Wowee Zowee Before I found my chi in the realm of independent music, I was your typical DMB fan.

by 34TH STREET

Fall songs

Street takes a glance at some of the best songs of the season. There is no reason to be sad in the fall.

by 34TH STREET

Editor's Picks

Jim Newell Brian Eno Another Green World Brian Eno is essential, and Another Green World is his masterpiece.

by 34TH STREET

Jazzy Phat Nasty

What does jazz really mean to people? For the average college student, jazz is the music we all know we should dig but can't quite get our heads around.

by PAUL FARBER

Editor's Picks

Jim Newell Jeff Mangum Live at Jittery Joe's In 1998, Neutral Milk Hotel released, in my opinion, the defining album of the '90s, In the Aeroplane Over the Sea. The band's only release our lonely ears have heard since is Jittery Joe's, recorded live by their enigmatic leader, Jeff Mangum, in 1997, and released in 2001.

by 34TH STREET

The Dirty South Rocks Out

"I don't hate you at all, really." Phew! Jason Isbell, guitarist and vocalist of the Drive-By Truckers has just reassured Street that Northern upbringings do not, after all, provoke hate in him.

by JIM NEWELL

Editor's Picks

Jim Newell Bjork Medulla Bjork is one of the few artists I feel perfectly comfortable sacrificing my masculinity to promote.

by 34TH STREET

Quick Spins

Badly Drawn Boy One Plus One is One Damon Gough, better known as Badly Drawn Boy, doesn't seem to know what he wants to be.

by 34TH STREET

In the Zone

Charlotte Martin recently finished driving across the country. She also managed to squeeze in a little singing along the way, since the drive was for a spring concert tour.

by WILL FENTON

Technicolor Spree

24 smiling white-robed musicians belting sunny verses and playing instruments like guitars and French horns.

by ANNE HENOCHOWICZ

Hear That Buzz?

Tyrannosaurus Hives is misleading after an inital spin. Compared to the garage band's second album, 2000's Veni Vidi Vicious, this album is cold and slick, very different from the raw Vicious, which had a basic live sound.

by JOHN CARROLL

Tipping The Scales

The Roots know they're on the cusp of entering the upper echelon of rap popularity. Forever championed by critics and underground hip-hop fans, the group has scored hits on their past two albums: "You Got Me" from 1999's Things Fall Apart and "The Seed (2.0)" from 2002's Phrenology. The Tipping Point means many things to the band, including that this album may very well decide if this band is accepted by the general hip-hop populace, or left to be appreciated by those who look hard enough for good hip-hop. Thus, it's rather ballsy that The Tipping Point's first single is "Don't Say Nuthin'," a track in which lead emcee Black Thought rips the bland hip-hop community that isn't saying anything.

by JOHN CARROLL

Heavy Lifting

The titles on Together We're Heavy, the second album from The Polyphonic Spree, are numbered from 11 to 20, continuing from the first ten sections of the band's debut, The Beginning Stages of... Despite the titling, however, things couldn't be more different on this sophomore effort. The Spree's debut was originally recorded as a demo, and didn't feature many of the current 21 group members.

by JOHN CARROLL

The Rising

There is one piece of advice that Dave Bielanko -- lead singer of Marah -- has for people who bash his band: "Whatever you wanna do is good with us.

by EUGENIA SALVO

Back To The Streets

"What's Ramones?" Mike Skinner, the one-man act of The Streets, asks from his cell phone, en route to Utah.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

Pop Rocks

Former Weezer bassist Matt Sharp told Street last week that he didn't understand distorting guitars these days.

by JOHN CARROLL

He's Come Undone

Matt Sharp has been in the music business for over a decade, but with the release of his self-titled solo debut, he finds himself back where he started, when he was Weezer's falsetto-singing bassist. "There were no expectations for that Weezer record," Sharp explains.

by JOHN CARROLL

To Heaven Through Hell

"Heavy punk rock is the best way to describe it," explains Ben Perri, lead singer of From Autumn to Ashes.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

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