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Music

Cutting-Edge Traditionalism

The shape-shifting world of entertainment requires new musicians to bend borders and break with stale conventions.

by JOHN COYNE

Editor's picks

Tami Fertig Gary Jules Mad World Nothing quite nurses a broken heart like a sad piano song.

by 34TH STREET

A 90 Day Case Study

Looking at the 90 Day Men's fourth and latest album, Panda Park, you develop a fascination with the overtly psychedelic cover art.

by JIM NEWELL

Albums

Michael McDermott Ashes For all the Jersey folk out there, there's been a change in tides.

by 34TH STREET

Editors' picks

Tami Fertig: Arab Strap Cherubs Imagine this: a sweet and simple guitar melody floating lazily atop the slow and steady beat of a drum machine -- over and over and over again.

by 34TH STREET

Coheed my call and listen to this band

Coheed and Cambria is "progressive rock, definitely not run-of-the-mill." Occasionally lumped into emo, or emo-core, the group's rock stylings are comparable to those of close friends and frequent tourmates, Thursday and Thrice.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

Albums

Ben Kweller On My Way Ben Kweller wrote his first album during puberty, lived his adolescence in a recording studio and now, at 22, professes to know life's transcendental truths.

by 34TH STREET

Split Kicks and bobbing heads

There are very few opportunities -- unless you are showering with them -- to hear a bassist singing.

by EUGENIA SALVO

Online Extra: Michael Franti and Spearhead/Ziggy Marley concert review

The Electric Factory is plastered with red, gold and green posters that invoke the spirit of peace, tolerance and reggae music.

by 34TH STREET

Online Extra: Simple Plan concert review

As it is at any concert featuring a band that has recently been on Total Request Live, the average age of those attending the Simple Plan show couldn't have been over 16, and that's including the small upstairs 21-and-over bar area.

by 34TH STREET

Online Extra: Broken Social Scene concert review

For their third visit to Philadelphia, Broken Social Scene invited their brass section (members of Stars, the night's opening act) on stage for a sultry night of indie rock.

by 34TH STREET

Editors' picks

Tami Fertig: The Magnetic Fields Get Lost Lest we forget, Magnetic Fields mastermind Stephin Merritt was making records long before 69 Love Songs. That one was okay, but c'mon.

by 34TH STREET

What if we all did have flying bicycles?

Dave Scher wishes people would dance at shows like they used to. One half of the duo that makes up California-based All Night Radio, Scher remembers his upbringing in Long Beach, California as a time when people danced at shows.

by EUGENIA SALVO

Albums

Lou Reed Animal Serenade Warner Brothers Lou Reed's 5,000th live album, Animal Serenade, shows that the 62-year-old legend can still put on a great show.

by 34TH STREET

Conspiracy theories

Jazz has long subsisted as an underground music -- an esoteric, impervious art form sheltered from consumer politics.

by JON LEVIN

Behind the Broken Social Scene

Back in 1999, Brendan Canning and Kevin Drew decided to turn their friendship into Broken Social Scene.

by JOHN BROOK

Albums

Carina Round The Disconnection Don't let her minor keys and tormented lyrics fool you: Carina Round is one happy camper.

by 34TH STREET

Lazy Journalism. Whatever.

What are you looking at right now? I am looking out the window at my next door neighbors' yard.

by ,

Editor's picks

Tami Fertig Q Lazzarus "Goodbye Horses" Y'know that scene in The Silence of the Lambs when serial killer Buffalo Bill tucks his crotch between his legs and dances naked to an obscure '80s synth-pop song before sewing a suit made of human skin?

by 34TH STREET

Not your average walkman

Hamilton Leithauser, lead singer of The Walkmen, isn't buying into any of the buzz. To him, the New York rock revival is nothing more than a press creation. "I don't buy any of that shit," he explains. Leithauser and bassist Peter Bauer left The Recoys in order to join The Walkmen, a group founded by three former members of Jonathan Fire*Eater -- Walter Martin, Paul Maroon and Matt Barrick. Fire*Eater was a critical success, and one of many "next big things" to never actually make it in the mainstream.

by JOHN CARROLL

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