As syllabus days quickly pass and the semester begins to intensify, textbook pages, problem sets, and recorded lectures are piling up like snow on Locust Walk. The titles on this list of pieces at the Philadelphia Museum of Art feel just a little too apt for what we’re all going through right now. 

Not Dead but Tired, Tired (1959) by George Biddle/ photo courtesy of PMA

Not Dead but Tired, Tired – George Biddle, Lithograph, 1959

The Descent of the Damned into Hell (1578) by Hendrick Goltzius/ photo courtesy of PMA

The Descent of the Damned into Hell – Hendrick Goltzius, Engraving, 1578

"Come on, Sir, Get Up." (1828) by Antoine–Jean–Baptiste Thomas/photo courtesy of PMA

"Come on, Sir, Get Up." – Antoine–Jean–Baptiste Thomas, Lithograph, 1828

It Is Better to Be Lazy (1797-1798) by Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes/ photo courtesy of PMA

It Is Better to Be Lazy (Mejor es holgar) – Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes, Etching and Aquatint, 1797-1798

In Full Cry (1820) by Thomas Doughty/ photo courtesy of PMA

In Full Cry – Thomas Doughty, Oil on Canvas, 1820

Praying Hermit (1783) by Johann Heinrich Tischbein II/ photo courtesy of PMA

Praying Hermit – Johann Heinrich Tischbein II, Etching and Drypoint, 1783

Desperate Navigators (1770) by Jean Baptiste Poly/ photo courtesy of PMA

Desperate Navigators – Jean Baptiste Poly, Etching and Engraving, 1770

In the Bad Lands (1904) by Edward S.Curtis/ photo courtesy of PMA

In the Bad Lands – Edward S. Curtis, Photogravure, 1904

The Slaughter of the Innocents (1817) by Ferdinand Piloty/ photo courtesy of PMA

The Slaughter of the Innocents – Ferdinand Piloty, Lithograph Printed with Tint Stone, 1817

Perspective View of a Prison (1800–1804) by Johann Friedrich Morgenstern/ photo courtesy of PMA

Perspective View of a Prison – Johann Friedrich Morgenstern, Etching, 1800-1804


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