34th Street Magazine is part of a student-run nonprofit.

Please support us by disabling your ad blocker on our site.

Arts & Entertainment

Press Play, Playa

Diddy and his Bad Boy camp taught hip-hop how to spend loot. Not some gambino-type Infiniti shit, I am talking Maybach shit.

by ,

We Didn't Start the Fire

Catch a Fire tells the true story of Patrick Chamusso (Derek Luke), a South African terrorist who joins the African National Congress (ANC) only because he is falsely accused of already having done so.

by ROB COHEN

Fresh and Funky

If there is a white picket fence along the rock-star trajectory, Chris Funk has likely found it. The Decemberists' jack-of-all-instruments (guitarists first and foremost; banjo, mandolin, bouzouki, pedal steel, glockenspiel, and hammered dulcimer follow suit) has a few weeks to spend with his family in Portland, Oregon before casting off on full tours of the U.S.

by VINCE LEVY

Bloody 'ell!

With a new album out and a national tour, Ben Kweller certainly is a busy fellow. Sacrificing valuable time for baby clothes shopping at a Cincinnati Old Navy, the one-man band takes a few moments to talk to Street about bloody noses, intellectual property, and even his music. Street: On your new album you play all the instruments yourself, was that something you planned on doing much prior to recording, or when exactly was that decision made? Kweller: It happened at the last minute.

by JOE YEAKEL

Panic on the Playground

In Todd Field's Little Children, the screen adaptation of the novel by Tom Perrotta, it's clear that the children in question are not those in the strollers, but the ones pushing them. Children is a story of suburban dissatisfaction.

by LIZ HOLM

Not Your average Church pedophilia Scandal

A case study on what could be called the biggest crisis to ever face the Catholic Church, Deliver Us from Evil tells the story of Father Oliver O'Grady, a California parishioner who sexually abused children throughout the 1970s and '80s.

by TIM WILKINS

A big step up from 'Battlefield Earth'

In a conference call this week, Street had the chance to sit down with actor Barry Pepper of Saving Private Ryan, 61*, and, most recently, Clint Eastwood's Flags of Our Fathers.

by STEVEN BACHMAN

Tween flicks are for kids

In the adaptation of his novel Stormbreaker, screenwriter Anthony Horowitz desperately tries to combine the plot aspects of a James Bond movie and the humor of Austin Powers.

by EMILY ROSENBAUM

Fairy Godfather

In the shadow of the massive success of his former band, Pixies frontman Frank Black has been diligently recording under his own name since 1993.

by ALEX JACOBS

Reviews

Chin Up Chin Up This Harness Can't Ride Anything Listening to This Harness Can't Ride Anything, the sophomore album from Chicago's Chin Up Chin Up, is much like a visit to the Midwest - forgettable. This Harness, recorded with producer Brian Deck (Modest Mouse, Iron & Wine), begins with promise.

by 34TH STREET

Vote Mrs. Doubtfire in

Every week, a sizable number of young Americans tunes into The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, and most have probably thought, at one point or another: "This guy should really get out of the whole late-night comedy thing and run for office." Stewart seems like the perfect candidate to some: his verbal whooping of Tucker Carlson on Crossfire proved his debating chops, and the rise of The Colbert Report gives him a natural running mate. Naturally, Hollywood is never too far behind, swooping in with Man of the Year to help indulge liberal fantasies.

by HEATHER SCHWEDEL

Where would Jesus camp?

Perhaps the most frightening movie Americans see this Halloween is neither Saw III nor The Grudge 2 but a documentary about evangelical Christians called Jesus Camp.

by JEFF LEVIN

Betsy Palmer's triumphant return

As someone who has made a few horror films, Felix Diaz is a huge fan of the genre. A man who believes that such films give the viewer "something you can't get from real life," Diaz sought to give horror, sci-fi, fantasy and thriller films the credit they deserve.

by JENNIFER ZUCKERMAN

Booty Rock

Featuring nothing but the gyrations of a particularly impressive female behind, the video for "Backyard Betty," Spank Rock's debut single, has a clear purpose: to get them asses shakin'. But the music is far from standard club hip-hop fare; in fact, the MC at the helm, 24-year-old Naeem Juwan, would rather avoid classification altogether. YoYoYoYoYo, Spank Rock's first full-length album, is a detailed collaborative effort: Naeem raps over beats ranging from Baltimore house to Hendrix, artfully layered by his childhood friend and producer, Alex "Armani XXXChange" Epton. Naeem attributes the eclecticism of the music to his move from Baltimore to Philly to become a Drexel student (and one-time Penn partygoer). "We come from Baltimore," he says, "and the cultures don't really mix up too much." Though early exposure to traditional hip-hop and the ecstatic phenomenon of 'B-more' club house continue to be profoundly influential on the pair, it primed Naeem for a musical awakening. "I really didn't know much about rock or punk or '80s, so when I went to Philly, things were a lot more diverse.

by CLAIRE STAPLETON

The truman show continues

In 1959, four members of a Kansas family were brutally murdered in their home. The gruesome killings inspired both a media frenzy and a literary classic, Truman Capote's In Cold Blood. Infamous illuminates the motivation behind the murders and Capote's coverage of the story.

by ,

YOUR WHAT FEELS LIKE CORN?!?

If you asked us which of today's popular young comics most definitely engages in recreational drug abuse, we'd probably say Dane Cook - in about a second.

by JONATHAN LEHR

Three-6 Mafia: 1, Scorsese: Almost 1

In his latest triumph, Martin Scorsese succeeds where few before him have: filming a remake that trumps the original in all respects.

by JEREMY PRICE

A Long December

It's a brave new world for Decemberists fans. The release of their new album, The Crane Wife, marks the group's shift to Capitol Records from indie Kill Rock Stars.

by VINCE LEVY

Home at Last

Political activism and artistic integrity go hand in hand," said a calm and composed Salim Washington over the phone from his New York office.

by TAYLOR HOWARD

No Man is an Island

By all accounts, life on the road is nasty, brutish and long. And on the eve of a North American tour, Islands' Nick Diamonds is sick in a Toronto hotel room, speaking in low tones to protect his voice.

by ALEX JACOBS

PennConnects

Most Read