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Arts & Entertainment

Great Scot!

The Last King of Scotland is an intense political thriller that brings to life the mythical figure of 1970s Ugandan dictator Idi Amin. Forest Whitaker's performance as Amin mesmerizes.

by DANIEL SABRA

Chinese Road Trip (Tom Green not Included)

In the Chinese film Riding Alone for Thousands of Miles, acclaimed director Yimou Zhang (House of Flying Daggers; Hero) presents a compelling meditation on father-son relationships.

by APRIL HAIL

A Royal Flush

In an age when one can't swing a bat in a video store without hitting a biopic, it's easy to get sick of movies that chronicle the lives of famous people, no matter how interesting those lives may or may not have been.

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Weird Science

Beck is a man known for wearing many hats at once. He has built his career upon shapeshifting, evading classification, seamlessly blending the unlikely with the illogical.

by STEVE MCLAUGHLIN

Reinventing Lennon

The U.S. vs. John Lennon traces pop star John Lennon's metamorphosis from mop-topped singer to one of the most eminent cultural icons of the 1970s. During that decade, his antiwar actions garnered media attention and the wrath of the Nixon administration, which persecuted Lennon by following, wiretapping and attempting to deport him. Aside from the political story, Lennon shows the passionate, complex relationship Lennon shared with his wife, Yoko Ono.

by DANIEL SABRA

Emily Haines

Some good CDs make you smile, some make you dance, and some make you cry. Emily Haines's Knives Don't Have Your Back belongs in the last category: bittersweet, but infectious all the same.

by SARAH BIRNBAUM

Sorority Life

At a time when pop culture phenomena like Paris Hilton and Hulk Hogan's daughter are relentlessly promoting their debut albums, the idea of the remake doesn't sound all that bad. Take Johnny Cash's cover of Nine Inch Nails' "Hurt," for instance.

by LAURA AMANN

A two-hour vigil with student radio

The outer room of WQHS is the most organized it's been in a long time. Rows and rows of CDs and LPs stand ordered alphabetically and by genre.

by GABE CRANE

Sandi Thom

Smile... It Confuses People is the kind of record that really makes you wonder. Whatever happened to the idyllic, innocent rebellion of our parents' generation?

by STEVE MCLAUGHLIN

He's Here for the Gang Bang

Perhaps no filmmaker today has a better grasp on a college guy's sense of humor than Todd Phillips. The director who cornered the market on frat-boy comedies - Old School, Road Trip - played Twenty Questions in an exclusive interview with Street at the Four Seasons downtown Tuesday to promote his new movie School for Scoundrels. Street: What's it like working with Jon Heder (Napoleon Dynamite)? What's he like in real life? Todd Phillips: In real life, Heder is a Mormon, did you know that? Street: I heard the cast from Napoleon was shipped in from Utah. TP: They're all like Mormon guys.

by STEPHEN MORSE

Fear is not a factor

Fearless 4 Stars Directed by: Ronny Yu Starring: Jet Li, Shido Nakamura Rated: PG-13 If Fearless truly is Jet Li's last martial arts film, as is advertised, then Li has succeeded in going out on top. It's hard to imagine that this movie could fall short of excellence, given the pedigree of its principles.

by TIM WILKINS

Sparklehorse

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. It's a motto that most aptly describes Sparklehorse's latest, a merely competent album that explores little new ground.

by RAFAEL GARCIA

Deep Sea Punking

In The Guardian, director Andrew Davis, best known for 1994's The Fugitive, dives deep into the world of the United States Coast Guard's elite rescue swimmers.

by STEVEN BACHMAN

She blinded me with science

Michel Gondry has a knack for taking the banal and making it extraordinary. In Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, the maxim "those who forget their past are destined to repeat it" provided a launching pad for an enigmatic journey to the heart of what it means to be human.

by JIM GOLDBLUM

Mad Tea Party

If you thought that the twang of country couldn't be combined with tedious sound effects and mild musical enthusiasm, then the monotonous sounds of Mad Tea Party's latest, Big Top Soda Pop, will quickly prove you wrong.

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More like middle ages

It's ironic that this relatively derivative, though not uninteresting, addition to the dystopian sci-fi genre is titled Renaissance.

by JESS PURCELL

Sultans of stunt (unabridged)

Jackass: Number Two's Johnny Knoxville and Bam Margera have made a living filming outrageous stunts that violate all notions of common sense and self-preservation.

by JEN TYTEL

Stark raving Mad

Based on the Robert Penn Warren novel and following the 1949 film, All the King's Men depicts the rise and fall of Governor Willie Stark (Sean Penn) through the eyes of his right-hand man, former-journalist Jack Burden (Jude Law). Burden follows Stark through his gubernatorial candidacy, and the corruption that follows his ascent to power through demagoguery.

by JENNIFER ZUCKERMAN

Music Reviews of: The Slats, The Mooney Suzuki, Kasabian, The Avett Brothers, Alexisonfire

The Slats Boom Patrol 4.5 Stars If you're on the prowl for something epic, progressive, and tasteful, don't look to the Slats.

by 34TH STREET

Hungry hungry hellions

Spawned by the filmmaking reality series Project Greenlight, Feast is a pretty unappetizing splatterfest from start to finish.

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