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Arts & Entertainment

Finally...

Jonathan Safran Foer is not a writer, he is a collector. As played by Elijah Wood, Foer is a vegetarian, an American, and a descendant of a Holocaust survivor, obsessed with mapping the details of his Jewish heritage.

by JESS PURCELL

Into the poo

Into the Blue, starring teen heartthrobs Paul Walker and Jessica Alba, pretty much unfolds as one would expect.

by DEREK MAZIQUE

Athletic Abilities

Music publications triumphantly announce when they've found "the next big thing" from the U.K. After the tenth time, it becomes hard to tell if they actually listen to some of these bands for any reason other than the fact that they're (gasp) British.

by 34TH STREET

Two thumbs down

What is the meaning of life? Based on the book by Walter Kirn, the new film Thumbsucker tries, but fails, to provide an answer to this often-asked question.

by JENNIFER ZUCKERMAN

Toilet water, with a twist

Although Roman Polanski's newest movie, Oliver Twist, at first seems to have a winning formula, it falls short in the end.

by CHELSEA ALBRIGHT

"Serenity now," the universal execs said

Serenity, the long-awaited film adaptation of director Joss Whedon's (Buffy the Vampire Slayer) cult-favorite TV series Firefly, has all of the components of a typical sci-fi action film, and little more.

by JEREMY PRICE

The nightmare before nuptuals

Despite its amazing visual style, Tim Burton's Corpse Bride is never as original or engaging as it should be.

by MATT KURUC

Old man trouble

Any McCartney-branded album is bound to be a "big deal." Sales-wise, the quality of the music is almost trivial.

by JON LEVIN

We killed sauron...now what?

Originally a graphic novel published by DC Comics last year, A History of Violence offers complex but uninspiring drama.

by JEFF LEVIN

Anniemal Instinct

In the world of pop music, Scandinavia has always been a source of successful imports. From ABBA to Ace of Base, these acts have remained unapologetically "pop," climbing to the top of the U.S.

by TODD GRABARSKY

Film interview: David Lynch

Four-time Academy Award nominee David Lynch, director of such contemporary classics as The Elephant Man, Blue Velvet and Mulholland Drive, is currently touring colleges around the U.S.

by JEFF LEVIN

Charlie murphy ALERT!

It's difficult to make a family comedy these days; the producers of Roll Bounce have learned that the hard way.

by TIM WILKINS

Jetting from Brazil

Seu Jorge ignited a samba fury during his sold-out show last Tuesday at the First Unitarian Church. Better known as the minstrel seaman with a penchant for acoustic Portuguese renditions of David Bowie classics in last year's The Life Aquatic, Jorge has emerged from humble beginnings in the slums of Rio de Janeiro to become a hot import in both the film and music worlds. Jorge and his charismatic band commanded the packed audience of urban hipsters, ethno-musicologists, and Brazilian fanatics with their no-frills local samba stylings.

by TODD GRABARSKY

Welcome to the gun show

It's difficult to categorize Lord of War, the newest release from Gattaca director (and The Terminal writer) Andrew Niccol about an underground arms dealer's rise from rags to riches.

by EVAN KOCH

Film interview: michael showalter

Michael Showalter doesn't think there's anything funny about Brooklyn. The actor-cum-writer-cum-director, renowned for playing Coop in Wet Hot American Summer (a film he co-wrote) and for his involvement in "Stella" on Comedy Central, has just released The Baxter, his directorial debut.

by YONA SILVERMAN

Sophomore Dropout

Kanye West stands as a fascinating figure in music today. The Chicago producer-turned-MC blends bourgeois intellectualism with lower-class sympathy, swagger with insecurity.

by TODD GRABARSKY

EllE Is Dead

For a romantic comedy that borrows considerably from Ghost, Just Like Heaven is about three times sweeter and funnier than it has any right to be.

by JEFF LEVIN

It's like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

Hong Kong-made Kung Fu Hustle features Stephen Chow, who happens to be the new martial arts "it" man. The film, set in '40s Shanghai, follows Sing (Chow), an alliance-shifting street rat who is caught in a gang war between the dreaded Axe Gang and the Pigsty Alley slum.

by TODD GRABARSKY

Inspirational Carjacking

Crash is a film that looks at the separate lives of a seemingly unrelated group of multi-ethnic people living in LA.

by STEPHEN MORSE

Gripping, no?

T he Interpreter, a well acted and politically relevant film, begins as U.N. interpreter Silvia Broome (Nicole Kidman) overhears a plot to assassinate Edmund Zuwanie, the president of the fictitious and war-torn African country Matobo.

by JESS PURCELL

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