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Film & TV

The People's Interview

What happened last night [at Wrestlemania]? We got beat. I had a blast last night. It was a lot of fun, it was cool.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

R-Rated Pornography

We're all relatively acquainted with the slew of coming-of-age teen comedies wherein implausibly attractive high school students overcome the bounds of social status, find love and provide a fortune cookie-sized moral to the tune of "Teenage Wasteland." The recipe works, though it usually makes for movies so saccharine that diabetics crumple to the floor of America's movie theaters.

by GERARD LEONE

Go directly to Hell

There are things out there that go bump in the night," quips Professor Bruttenholm (John Hurt). "We are the ones who bump back." No, this isn't your average weekend-drunken-sorority-girl- hook-up; it's Guillermo del Toro's above average comic-to-movie film Hellboy. Mix two parts X-Men, two parts Men In Black technology and a sprinkle of The Hulk's big buff looks, and you have the recipe that not only looks good but doesn't leave a bad taste in your mouth. Based on Mike Mignola's comic book series, Hellboy opens in 1944 as the Nazis, led by Grigori Rasputin, attempt to open a portal to another dimension.

by COREY HULSE

"When you get a little older, you get a little softer"

No, the problem child was and always will be Dogma. Nothing can be more problematic than that.

by LEAH COLINS

Oh brother

Con artists are en vogue right now. Brad Pitt, Mark Wahlberg and Nicolas Cage have all dabbled in thievery.

by ADAM KATZ

Review: Taking Lives

With Hollywood constantly churning out thrillers with obligatory "surprise endings," it's great to see a satisfying conclusion that doesn't make the movie fold like a house of cards.

by 34TH STREET

Zombies are hot

Carnage, carnage, blood, blood and then more carnage. The remake of the 1974 horror classic Dawn of the Dead retains elements of the original, while changing the story entirely.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

My mind is a total blank

Everyone already knows that Charlie Kaufman is a genius. This is an acknowledged fact. The man who brought us both Being John Malkovich and Adaptation could not possibly be anything less.

by 34TH STREET

Passionate About The Passion

Movies and religion have never mixed well. Inevitably, a movie will misrepresent one religion or another and be faced with protests and threats of boycotts.

by EUGENE NOVIKOV

Don't sleep with Ashley Judd

In Twisted, directed by Philip Kaufman, Ashley Judd plays Detective Jessica Shepard. After the gruesome death of her parents, Jessica is raised by John Mills (Samuel Jackson), the San Francisco Police Commissioner.

by MATS OLSEN

You can't touch this ... without seven pairs of gloves

Badass. This movie is simply badass. When was the last time you heard of actors filming on the side of a mountain with 100 mph winds and ice crusting on their faces?

by HANNAH WURZEL

It was a man's man's man's world

Getting punched in the face really hurts. Doing it for a living is brutal and difficult. Yet both are easier than taking a no-name boxer to the championship, especially as a woman. In Against the Ropes, chick flick diva Meg Ryan breaks out of her stereotypical role to play boxing's most prolific female coach, Jackie Kallen.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

50 Chances to get with Drew Barrymore

What's that saying? "If it ain't broke, don't fix it?" Director Peter Segal surely had that motto in mind when he once again teamed up Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore in their latest romantic comedy, 50 First Dates. Veterinarian Henry Roth (Adam Sandler) is a ladies' man known to date women who are on vacation, thereby avoiding any form of commitment.

by LEAH COLINS

Sex bomb, sex bomb, you're a sex bomb

After all, an orgasm is better than a bomb," quipped relieved director Bernardo Bertolucci about the release of an uncut version of his highly provocative film to U.S.

by MATS OLSEN

Review: Miracle

When a story wraps up with an inspirational fairy tale ending, many can't help but gag. Still, in 1980 those same gaggers joined the nation in celebrating the United States Olympic hockey team's victory over the seemingly unbeatable Russian squad.

by 34TH STREET

Review: The Fog of War

Never answer the question asked of you. Answer the question you wish was asked of you," Robert McNamara says with a hint of a grin towards the end of The Fog of War, a documentary on the infamous Secretary of Defense.

by 34TH STREET

Review: The Triplets of Belleville

Sick of Phil Collins songs and cute animal sidekicks? Sylvain Chomet's bizarre new full-length cartoon, The Triplets of Belleville, follows the story of an atypical French family: Champion, a lonely boy-turned wraith-like cyclist, his club-footed, industrious grandmother, Madame Souza and their obese dog, Bruno.

by 34TH STREET

Charlize theron's golden globes

The Golden Globe Awards have always been somewhat of a mystery. Handed out by the enigmatic Hollywood Foreign Press Association to reward accomplishments in both film and television, the Golden Globes' primary function has typically been as a reasonably accurate predictor of the Academy Award nominations and, eventually, the winners.

by 34TH STREET

Hawaiian Wipeout

In the opening scene of George Armitage's The Big Bounce, Jack Ryan (Owen Wilson) quips, "For a long time, I've been walking down the road of life with my two best friends, bad luck and bad choices." Both of them have led Wilson and the star-studded cast down to Hawaii on a terrible remake of an already awful 1969 film based on a novel by Elmore Leonard (Get Shorty). Ryan, the wild-haired surfer rebel and petty criminal, is fired from his construction job for smacking his British foreman with a baseball bat (take THAT, you cricket-lovin' fool!). Ryan is set loose in Hawaii, thanks to a pardon from the District Judge Walter Crewes (Morgan Freeman). He returns to breaking and entering and befriends the sinister -- yet scantily clad -- Nancy Hayes (Sara Foster). Nancy and Ryan collaborate to steal $200,000 from Nancy's lover and Ryan's former boss, Ray Ritchie (Gary Sinise). Ray's slimy personal assistant, Bob Rogers, Jr.

by COREY HULSE

Hey Ashton, You so Fine

Yes folks, it's Ashton Kutcher, all grown up -- with a beard to prove it. The Butterfly Effect gets its title from the chaos theory premise wherein a butterfly flapping its wings in New York might cause a tsunami in Japan.

by LEAH COLINS

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