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Campus Life

Change sucks

There are times in life when that which you love is also that which you loathe. I am familiar with this feeling -- the queasy nausea of obsessive repulsion.

by YONA SILVERMAN

NBC ya later

Motivated by nostalgia to continue the ten plus years of bonding with the gang at Central Perk, I tuned in to Joey (Thursdays at 9 p.m.) with the hope that Tribbiani wasn't dead.

by ALEXIS STEIN

Sex and the Suburbs

Those of us sitting at home mourning the loss of Sex and the City on Sunday nights can check out this new group of girlfriends.

by SARA LEVINE

He's no Jerry

Jason Alexander returns to primetime in CBS's new comedy Listen Up (premiering Sept. 20 at 8:30 p.m.). This time around, Alexander's a well-renowned sports broadcaster who finds it hard to command respect when it comes to his own family.

by ABBY NATELSON

Reality bites

Stop the pretending; we know your secret. You skipped the company barbeque to watch the finale of Outback Jack. And then you went to the CBS website after missing an episode of the Amazing Race, just to see if those douchebag twins were finally given the boot.

by CLARE OCONNOR

Bye, bye, bye

Street has a lot of senior goodbyes to make as the Spring semester comes to a close. But really, rather than interact with precious friends for the last time, we have become obsessed with the final episodes of our favorite TV shows.

by 34TH STREET

Finally, a cure for ugly

I love plastic surgery shows. Seriously. Extreme Makeover (ABC), I Want a Famous Face (MTV) and now The Swan (FOX) top my list of must-see TV programs each week.

by LAUREN DZUBOW

'Street' Meets 'Street'

On Sunday, the beloved TV series Sesame Street kicked off its 35th anniversary season with Sesame Street Presents: The Street We Live On. Teaching the preschool basics with wit and warmth, Sesame Street has inspired millions of children, parents, grandparents and second-childhood college students.

by ANNE HENOCHOWICZ

Mommy, Buy Me A Commodore 64

If your parents fed you Nintendo for breakfast, then this is one program you need to see. Video Game Invasion: The History of a Global Obsession highlights how nerds from across the world built up the video game industry from the creation of Pong in 1972, to the current gaming industry, valued at over 20 billion dollars. Hosted by pro-skateboard champion and video game star Tony Hawk, viewers are taken on a journey back to when games were played on old systems like the Atari 2600, the Commodore 64 and the Colecovision. In more recent years, larger corporations like Sony and Microsoft have broken into the market by capitalizing on the untapped resource of the Internet with the PlayStation and the Xbox.

by COREY HULSE

Bam! It's over! They win it!

On week one of Dream Job, Mike Hall was voted off by America, perhaps because of his reference to Kerri Strug's gold-medal clinching performance in the 1996 Olympics as the greatest sports moment of all time. On Sunday night, the Missouri senior was voted by America to be the next SportsCenter anchor.

by DANIEL MCQUADE

Commercials suck

In a freakish turn of events, seven of our best TV shows on DVD begin with the letters S or F. Despite such great odds, Saved by the Bell and Farscape didn't make the cut, but 10 other great television shows did.

by YONA SILVERMAN

Turn on your gaydar

Playing it Straight -- Fox's new reality series set on a dude ranch in Elko, Nevada -- premiered two weeks ago and asked the question: can a single cowgirl tell the difference between gay and straight cowboys?

by CLAYTON NEUMAN

They're here, they're queer

Street talked to Hal Sparks, Penn alum Robert Gant and Harris Allan, the stars of Showtime's provocative series Queer as Folk, at the TLA Video Store.

by MAWUSE ZIEGBE

The Singing Sopranos

The hit HBO series The Sopranos finally returns to TV with all new episodes this month. But after two years of anticipation, America's favorite crime family has become America's favorite soap opera.When the fourth season of The Sopranos ended on December 8, 2002, fans of the show were left with cliffhangers: Adriana (Drea De Matteo) was ratting on Christopher (Michael Imperioli) to the Feds, Paulie (Tony Sirico) was telling family secrets to Johnny Sack's (Vincent Curatola) New York family, people were beginning to wonder where Ralphie (Joe Pantoliano) was, and Carmella (Edie Falco) kicked Tony (James Gandolfini) out of the house. Fans patiently waited for the resolution of these plotlines, which usually takes The Sopranos no more than one or two episodes.

by CLAYTON NEUMAN

Burn the midnight oil

Every Sunday at midnight, a small, dedicated and "larger than you'd think" group of viewers -- primarily freshmen -- tune in to Midnight Live, UTV's longest running and most popular show.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

A little sex in all of us

My family got HBO for me two and a half years ago, because I wanted to watch Sex and the City. Back then, HBO was still considered uncool in New York.

by YONA SILVERMAN

Girls on girls

What's hotter than four single women trolling for men in Manhattan? Lesbians. Every Sunday, Showtime brings you The L Word, a voyeuristic look into the lives of a group of lesbian, bisexual and bicurious women looking for love in Los Angeles. Jenny, a straight and doe-eyed writer, is living with her perfect boyfriend Tim when the season begins.

by 34TH STREET

Rock the Vote

The person that thought to call Alice Paul (Hilary Swank) and Lucy Burns (Francis O'Connor) a pair of "iron jawed angels" deserves a cookie. Directed by Katja von Garnier for HBO Films, 1912 Philadelphia comes alive in the depiction of the struggles of two young suffrage activists who break down Congress' overwhelming opposition towards the women's movement.

by AMANDA JASSO

The real deal?

This is the true story of one girl, picked to live in a shitty dorm and write a review to find out what happens when you gather annoying typecasts and start being cliche.

by RACHEL SENTURIA

Late-Night Showdown

The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, 11:00pm, Comedy Central The two-minute celebrity interviews are totally pointless, but otherwise Stewart and his correspondents put a very entertaining twist on the top news stories of the day. The Daily Show was the first to break the story on Habitat for Humanity's monopoly on the global poverty housing market, and it revealed West Virginia's plan to isolate itself from the rest of the country in order to preserve its good genes. Anyone who cares about the 2004 presidential election should be sure to watch "Indecision 2004" in order to make an informed voting decision.

by JOHN CARROLL

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