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Film & TV

Freedom Fighter

The four-star grade is pretty random. As a film, Fahrenheit 9/11 has its flaws, but as a 2004 event, it's more important than any other movie released in 2004.

by JOHN CARROLL

Quick Flick: De-lovely

De-Lovely depicts the life of legendary songsman Cole Porter. Director Irwin Winkler manages to incorporate into the film nearly every significant piece of music that Porter composed.

by 34TH STREET

Don't Pick On Me

Like many Ben Stiller movies, Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story features a great comic premise that never fires on all cylinders.

by JOHN CARROLL

Over The Hump

The Story of the Weeping Camel is a German quasi-documentary filmed in Mongolia's Gobi Desert.

by CARRIE GREENE

This Flight Is Grounded

Steven Spielberg's is on a roll. Wait, scratch that, he was on a roll. In 1998, Spielberg released Saving Private Ryan, and then followed that acclaimed project with A.I., Minority Report, and Catch Me if You Can over the following four years.

by JOHN CARROLL

Walk Away from the Light

Hard-core Christians are going to hate this movie. Then again, the whole point of it is to make fun of them. Saved! has balls.

by ALYSSA LEGLER

A Case of the Mondays

Garfield is a cartoon that many kids watched as a child. Looking back, the cartoon wasn't very funny.

by JOHN CARROLL

The Chronicles of Ridiculous

Vin Diesel has the mental capacity of a Lego Block. That becomes clear as Diesel, once an up-and-coming action hero, reprises one of his most Neanderthal-like roles.

by JAMES SCHNEIDER

Double Dog Dare Ya!

Love Me If You Dare is not your average movie about childhood sweethearts. Julien and Sophie have been madly in love since grade school.

by MARKIAN DOBCZANSKY

Back to Wizard World

The Potterphobic won't go to see the film. The Potterphilic will be compelled by overwhelming hype. On the sidelines, probably dragged by their Potterphilic friends, will be those who balk at the idea of seeing the movie before reading the books. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban will not disappoint the two latter groups.

by GERARD LEONE

What a Disaster

MoveOn.org, a democratic, internet-based advocacy group, billed The Day After Tomorrow as "The Movie the White House Doesn't Want You To See." For once, the White House demonstrates some good taste.

by JOHN CARROLL

It's No Hogwarts

Comic books carry a bad stigma. The common man regards them as cheap, childish rags that should be abandoned as one enters the adult world.

by JOHN CARROLL

A Classic Classic

Already, Troy is the best film of the summer. The hyped movie fails to disappoint and is reminiscent of Gladiator. While those who know Homer's story of Greece's siege of Troy will find no surprises in this movie, they will certainly be delighted by it.

by ABUBAKARI ZUBERI

Black and Vice

If a film could ever ooze indie cred, it would probably be Jim Jarmusch's Coffee and Cigarettes. The film, comprised of a series of vignettes, was shot over the past two decades, and at times plays like a short story collection on film.

by JOHN CARROLL

Green with Envy

The original Shrek lost a lot over repeat viewings. People frequently quoting the parfait line didn't help, either.

by JOHN CARROLL

Put Him OUT

The special effects are outstanding. After viewing the trailer, I thought they would be all I had to look forward to.

by MAGGIE HENNEFELD

Gaze Into My Crystal Ball

What do you get when you combine a happening '80s soundtrack with the storyline of a New York pre-teen who wants to become an adult?

by COREY HULSE

Cannes You Believe It?

The lines are longer, the shows are selling out and the Philadelphia Film Festival, now in its 13th year, is more fun than it's ever been.

by 34TH STREET

Tarantino on my mind

Kill Bill Vol. 2 is such a hairpin turn away from the amusing but disappointing first chapter of Quentin Tarantino's epic that unsuspecting moviegoers can almost be forgiven for the knee-jerk negative response it is sure to elicit.

by EUGENE NOVIKOV

Reviews

The Whole Ten Yards Starring Bruce Willis, Matthew PerryDirected by Howard DeutchRated PG-13 Every time I try to say something substantive about The Whole Ten Yards, the only thing that can come out of my mouth are variations on "it was a pile of crap." Director Howard Deutch gives us a barrage of ethnic jokes, repeated slapping and Matthew Perry waving his arms around and falling down, and leaves it up to the marketing department to make the movie seem funny.

by 34TH STREET

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