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Music

patriarch

Patriarch - of Palestinian blood, born in San Francisco - exists outside of both the floundering hyphy movement and the indie powder-rap scene of the Bay Area.

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son volt

Son Volt frontman Jay Farrar, whose pioneering work in Uncle Tupelo in the early 1990's (with Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy) influenced a host of later artists, brushes his canvas with new colors on an impressive new effort, The Search.

by ANDREW POLLEN

blinded by the light

Here is a preamble: The Arcade Fire is by far my favorite band of the 21st century. Their 2004 debut Funeral changed my life, and as a Montrealer, I have watched the band garner international success and their side projects, Final Fantasy and La Bell Orchestre, grow up with them.

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Youtube Clip of the week

Whistling is like sex.

by COLIN JACOBSEN

Youtube clip of the week

Few artists have gone into hiding with fame on their doorstop like Justin King.

by ANDREW POLLEN

Reviews

Winterpills The Light Divides After the first few tracks off The Light Divides, the Winterpills' new album, you might think you're listening to the Dawson's Creek soundtrack.

by RAFAEL GARCIA

Paging Dr. Dog

When they took the stage at Johnny Brenda's last Friday - their first ever sold-out show - the five men of Dr. Dog were appropriately West Philly in appearance.

by STEVE MCLAUGHLIN

Crowd's eye view

On Saturday evening, February 17th, a sellout crowd at World Caf‚ Live was treated to an entrancing performance by Chris Thile and his prog bluegrass ensemble, the How To Grow A Band, who are currently touring to support Thile's newest album, How to Grow A Woman from the Ground.

by SHANE TEPPER

Youtube clip of the week

Few artists have gone into hiding with fame on their doorstop like Justin King.

by ANDREW POLLEN

The used

Considering The Used haven't released a new record since 2004, any release seems long-overdue. But it's unlikely that Berth, a live album, will satisfy fans like new material - especially with the bands next LP, originally set for release last year, postponed to April.

by TAYLOR HOWARD

k-os

Heaven only knows what was on Kheaven Brereton's mind when he embarked on his latest venture. Canadian vocalist/emcee/producer of K-OS's third release, Atlantis: Hymns for Disco, is an ambitious array of samples, weaved together with drum machine beats and riddled with spiritual guidance.

by HANNAH WIZMAN-CARTIER

Going down singin'

Last summer, in the chocolate bazaar of Chocolate World in Hershey, Pennsylvania, a friend and I couldn't help but notice scores of elementary school girls bedecked in black eyeliner and pyramid-studded belts.

by ALEX KWAN

ashley tisdale

ashley tisdale Headstrong Call it post-pop. In a world where we readily accept a Paris Hilton solo album, it is no longer a matter of a celeb dropping an LP and getting ignored.

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Waning moon?

Following the critical successes of the Maximum Black EP in 1999 and the People Get Ready LP in 2000, garage-rockers The Mooney Suzuki looked poised to walk down fame's yellow brick road - the White Stripes holding one hand and The Strokes the other. For whatever reason, that happy dream didn't quite materialize for The Mooney Suzuki.

by MATT WALSH

YouTube clip of the week

Blur's take on the song of unrequited love is easy on the ears, hidden amidst heavy tones of British frustration and veiled happiness; the song is matter-of-factly titled "Good Song." "Good Song" was so good, in fact, that it inspired design troupe Shynola and artist David Shrigley to create an animated interpretation of lead singer Damon Albarn's lyrics.

by MIKE LIN

Twinkle twinkle little starr*

Philly rockers stellastarr* are back in town tonight for an appearance at North Star Bar. Street writer Alex Kwan sat down for a phone interview with lead singer and guitarist Michael Jurin and talked about New York's "Sixth Burough", stellastarr*'s new album and the state of the biz. Street: Hey Michael, good to grab you in between sets.

by ALEX KWAN

As Heard on TV

The Show: Scrubs The Song: Martin Sexton, "Diner" Anyone who has ever kept the Garden State soundtrack on repeat knows Zach Braff's knack for musical selection.

by RUBEN BROSBE

The Safes

There is nothing quite so cloying as the sound of a completely mediocre album. The Safes unleash Well, Well, Well on the world with nary a regard for hooks or cohesion.

by RAFAEL GARCIA

You Tube of the Week

It's a bold new age of information. YouTube represents an archive of millions of hidden or long-forgotten documentations of some of the greatest performers in music, free and at the tips of our fingers.

by EVAN GOLDIN

writer's bloc?

A successful debut LP can be a blessing or a curse. It can be the precursor of legitimate greatness or it can spell doom for a band's future with the weight of unachievable expectations (think of the wasted potential of The Libertines or The Stills). The real pressure for these groups lies on their second album, where they have so much more to lose. Bloc Party fans everywhere had been crossing off days on their calendars in anticipation of February 6th, the release date of the band's second studio album, A Weekend In The City.

by ALEX KWAN

PennConnects

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