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Film & TV

The United States Conference of Street Bishops

Of late we have been approached by many mothers concerned for the state of their children's moral health in light of the tragic lack of Christian values exhibited by our country's majority.

by POPE JOHN PAUL II

The cesspool of celebrity

We here at Street care about your moral well-being. We also know that some of you have been sucked way too far into the doomed world of celebrity.

by 34TH STREET

Benicio del Toro is Hot

They say that at the moment a person dies, they lose exactly 21 grams. On a death bed questioning this very phenomenon, begins 21 Grams, the new film by Amores Perros writer Guillermo Arriaga and director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu. Originally written in Spanish, but adapted for more exposure and notable English-speaking cast, the film shows the intense few months before and after a deathly accident forces three lives from very different backgrounds to intersect.

by EUGENIA SALVO

Where Are They Now?

Caroline in the City (1995-1999) ? Caroline Duffy married Del and then tragically lost a limb in a freakish accident involving ink and a spatula. ? Richard Karinsky finally realized he was gay and broke the Duffster's heart for good. ? Del Cassidy was the first to create a "You lost a limb and I no longer love you" greeting card. My So-Called Life (1994-1995) ? Angela Chase finally got a clue. ? Jordan Catalano cut his hair and stopped being hot.

by YONA SILVERMAN

Quick Flicks

The Missing 2 of 5 stars Directed by: Ron Howard Starring: Tommy Lee Jones, Cate Blanchett Rated: R Breaking away from his built-for-an-Oscar work on A Beautiful Mind, Ron Howard presents a less commercial, less inspired offering in The Missing. Set in rural New Mexico in the late 19th century, the tedious and thin plot finds Maggie (Cate Blanchett) accepting the help of her estranged father (Tommy Lee Jones) in a heroic hunt for her teenage daughter Lily.

by 34TH STREET

Nathaniel Kahn interview

Earlier this week, Nathaniel Kahn sat down with Street to discuss his new movie, My Architect. My Architect is an emotional and intelligent film dealing with Nathaniel Kahn's loss of his father, famed architect Louis Kahn, a Penn graduate and professor.

by 34TH STREET

Reviews

In Tupac: Resurrection, the story of late hip-hop artist Tupac Shakur is told viscerally through the use of his own words.

by 34TH STREET

She Was the Slutty One

We all know her best as troubled youth Jen on Dawson's Creek, and fondly remember her for films such as Dick, Halloween H20, But I'm a Cheerleader and, of course, Lassie. Now Michelle Williams is taking her career to the next level, as she boldly abandons Hollywood (goodbye Lassie) and makes her mark on the independent film industry.

by MAGGIE HENNEFIELD

Santa's Got a Brand New Bag

With the holiday season approaching, filmmakers are full of warm fuzzies in the hopes of touching a few wallets with that holiday spirit.

by EUGENIA SALVO

Jesus died for somebody's sins

The Matrix was a good movie. Perhaps a great movie to some, but commonly accepted as at least a good movie by most.

by YONA SILVERMAN

Quick Flicks

Love Actually Directed by: Richard Curtis Starring: Hugh Grant, Colin Firth, Keira Knightley, Emma Thompson Rated: R 3 out of 5 stars Love Actually not only has eight times the characters of a typical love story, but eight times the Christmas spirit!

by 34TH STREET

You've come a long way, baby

The Bridge: Cinema de Lux opened its doors on Nov. 8, 2002, and after a year of operation, the theater has come a long way from the chaos that surrounded its opening weekend.

by JOHN CARROLL

Movies we were too prudish to see

Back in the day, John Holmes was the biggest -- and therefore the best -- in the biz. "Johnny Wadd" starred in more than 2000 adult productions and reportedly bedded more than 10,000 women over the course of his career -- including his wife. Probably the only guy who might really have been hornier than Ron Jeremy, he was well-endowed.

by YONA SILVERMAN

My life sucks, too

Ann's life seems to fit the perfect formula for misery. She's 23, works a dead-end job, lives in a trailer with her two young daughters and husband, puts up with a tired and cynical mother and has a jail-bird for a dad. So, when Ann (Sarah Polley) finds out that she has cancer and only has two or three months left to live, she realizes her life has to change.

by JANICE HAHN

No soap radio

After seeing the trailer for Radio, one might think that the film is some sort of amalgam of Remember the Titans and The Waterboy. "This is actually the anti-Waterboy. We tried to get as far from that sort of film as possible," says director Michael Tollin. Loosely inspired by a true story, Radio follows a mentally challenged black man who, thanks to the efforts of a high school football coach, becomes a beloved member of the community in a small town in South Carolina.

by DAVID MORGAN

Gwyneth Paltrow is overrated

Anyone looking for a movie about Sylvia Plath, the poet, should skip this rendition. The working title for this movie (Ted and Sylvia), would have been much more appropriate, since it is basically a summary of the tumultuous relationship between Plath and fellow poet Ted Hughes.

by EUGENIA SALVO

My life is a movie...

In honor of not winning the lottery this week, Street took a little time to find out what the movie of your life would be about.

by 34TH STREET

A Family Affair

If families who pray together stay together, then families who act together must contract together, because in Hollywood, not only do individuals get typecast -- sibling sets do, too.

by YONA SILVERMAN

Review: The Station Agent

In Thomas McCarthy's Sundance winner, the first time director/writer quirkily tackles the issue of dwarfism. This indie flick revolves around the budding friendship of three misplaced souls.

by 34TH STREET

Review: Veronica Guerin

Veronica Guerin is a moderately effective flashback biography, worth seeing for Cate Blanchett's curious performance (one part fearlessness, two parts foolishness) as the titular expos‚ journalist. Guerin, Ireland's most recent martyr, jeopardized her family and lost her life for the cause of improved anti-drug legislation.

by 34TH STREET

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